The Boxer is happy, friendly, intelligent, attentive, and loyal. Boxers develop strong, close bonds with family. They have lots of energy and a serious demeanor, though they can be clownish and playful as well. They like to grab and carry around just about anything they can in their mouths. Boxers tend to get rowdy when the food bowl is empty. They make excellent guardians and companions.
In competition obedience training, “heel” means the dog is walking on your left side with his head even with your knee while you hold the leash loosely. Puppy training can be a little more relaxed with the goal being that they walk politely on a loose leash without pulling. Some trainers prefer to say “let’s go” or “forward” instead of “heel” when they train this easy way of walking together.
When your dog knows the release cue and how to sit on cue, put him in a sit, turn and face him, and give him a treat. Pause, and give him another treat for staying in a sit, then release him. Gradually increase the time you wait between treats (it can help to sing the ABC’s in your head and work your way up the alphabet).  If your dog gets up before the release cue, that’s ok! It just means he isn’t ready to sit for that long so you can make it easier by going back to a shorter time.
You can teach your puppy at home and I'll help you. My puppy training book is called Respect Training for Puppies: 30 Seconds to a Calm, Polite, Well-Behaved Puppy. I'll show you my proven step-by-step training schedule for teaching your puppy all the words he needs to know, plus consistent household rules and routines, housebreaking, crate training, acceptance of being handled, calmness, gentleness, and general obedience training.
The Boxer is happy, friendly, intelligent, attentive, and loyal. Boxers develop strong, close bonds with family. They have lots of energy and a serious demeanor, though they can be clownish and playful as well. They like to grab and carry around just about anything they can in their mouths. Boxers tend to get rowdy when the food bowl is empty. They make excellent guardians and companions.

Make the puppy come to you. While he’s on his way to you, still wearing the leash and collar, back up a few paces and then reward him when he gets to you. Continue the progression until your puppy, upon hearing the cue noise, comes to you and walks with you a few paces. Remember that puppies have a short attention span, so keep your sessions short, and end them when your puppy is still eager to do more, not when he’s mentally exhausted.


Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.
Next, drop a treat on the floor near you. As soon as your puppy finishes the treat on the ground, say his name again. When he looks up, give him another treat. Repeat this a couple of times until you can begin tossing the treat a little further away, and he can turn around to face you when you say his name. Avoid repeating your puppy’s name; saying it too often when he doesn’t respond makes it easier for him to ignore it. Instead, move closer to your puppy and go back to a step where he can be successful at responding to his name the first time.
The Boxer is happy, friendly, intelligent, attentive, and loyal. Boxers develop strong, close bonds with family. They have lots of energy and a serious demeanor, though they can be clownish and playful as well. They like to grab and carry around just about anything they can in their mouths. Boxers tend to get rowdy when the food bowl is empty. They make excellent guardians and companions.
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